Project MonMa in China

Project Monma travelled to Lugu Lake in China to learn more about Mosou women who have become known for their matrinlieal society and for their powerful position in society. We aimed to learn more about women’s role in the Mosou and how women have been able to achieve such a high status in their society.

In the Mosou, relationships between men and women are centered around love and both men and women are free to choose their partners and change them as they wish. There is also uniquely, no requirement for men or women to get married. Rather the Mosou engage in what they call walking marriages where a man and woman may have a relationship together without formally being married, much like the relationship between a boyfriend and girlfriend.

Yizu for example, a Mosou woman who lives and works on a farm not far from Lugu Lake spends her days doing farm work and taking care of the family. She lives with her partner with whom she had a walking marriage. As she prepares the families lunch in their modest home, she explains that in Mosou culture, men and women are treated equally. Violence is also something that she hasn’t heard of. ‘It’s not a problem for Mosou women, women should be safe.’ She attributes the great equality enjoyed between men and women due to cultural expectations of being kind.

All of the men we with spoke strongly against violence against women and all of them said that in Mosou culture, violence against women was not allowed.

‘I feel angry when I hear about stories of violence against women,’ said Giruduzhi, a Mosou man. ‘It’s not common in Mosou culture. Women work very hard for the family, we have to respect them,’ he explained. ‘Its not allowed in our culture for a man to hit a woman. If I saw a man hitting a woman I would think badly of him and try to stop him.’

Another Mosou man working in a local museum agreed that violence against women is not allowed. As an old man in traditional Mosou clothing chanted Buddhist prayers behind us, he explained that the united nature of Mosou culture protects women.

‘We believe that you have to be good to both boys and girls,’ he said. For a young man working as a boat driver on Lugu Lake, he explained that the strong role of women in Mosou culture is due the powerful role of the mother and the grandmother. 

‘Both men and women are considered equal. They respect each other,’ he said. Luruduoji, a local Mosou man living by Lugu Lake, explained that equality and non violence is taught to Mosou men from a young age.

‘We are taught to be kind by our families. I learned that from my uncle and my grandfather,’ he said. In fact, all of the Mosou men we met agreed that violence against women was not acceptable. Not meet a single woman who complained about violence in Mosou society.

The Mosou are an example of how things can be in the world. They are a demonstration that it is possible for relationships between men and women to be based around love and respect. They are also a demonstration that men can show that they are men, without it involving degrading or being violent towards women. 

Project MonMa in China

Project Monma travelled to Lugu Lake in China to learn more about Mosou women who have become known for their matrinlieal society and for their powerful position in society. We aimed to learn more about women’s role in the Mosou and how women have been able to achieve such a high status in their society.

In the Mosou, relationships between men and women are centered around love and both men and women are free to choose their partners and change them as they wish. There is also uniquely, no requirement for men or women to get married. Rather the Mosou engage in what they call walking marriages where a man and woman may have a relationship together without formally being married, much like the relationship between a boyfriend and girlfriend.

Yizu for example, a Mosou woman who lives and works on a farm not far from Lugu Lake spends her days doing farm work and taking care of the family. She lives with her partner with whom she had a walking marriage. As she prepares the families lunch in their modest home, she explains that in Mosou culture, men and women are treated equally. Violence is also something that she hasn’t heard of. ‘It’s not a problem for Mosou women, women should be safe.’ She attributes the great equality enjoyed between men and women due to cultural expectations of being kind.

All of the men we with spoke strongly against violence against women and all of them said that in Mosou culture, violence against women was not allowed.

‘I feel angry when I hear about stories of violence against women,’ said Giruduzhi, a Mosou man. ‘It’s not common in Mosou culture. Women work very hard for the family, we have to respect them,’ he explained. ‘Its not allowed in our culture for a man to hit a woman. If I saw a man hitting a woman I would think badly of him and try to stop him.’

Another Mosou man working in a local museum agreed that violence against women is not allowed. As an old man in traditional Mosou clothing chanted Buddhist prayers behind us, he explained that the united nature of Mosou culture protects women.

‘We believe that you have to be good to both boys and girls,’ he said. For a young man working as a boat driver on Lugu Lake, he explained that the strong role of women in Mosou culture is due the powerful role of the mother and the grandmother. 

‘Both men and women are considered equal. They respect each other,’ he said. Luruduoji, a local Mosou man living by Lugu Lake, explained that equality and non violence is taught to Mosou men from a young age.

‘We are taught to be kind by our families. I learned that from my uncle and my grandfather,’ he said. In fact, all of the Mosou men we met agreed that violence against women was not acceptable. Not meet a single woman who complained about violence in Mosou society.

The Mosou are an example of how things can be in the world. They are a demonstration that it is possible for relationships between men and women to be based around love and respect. They are also a demonstration that men can show that they are men, without it involving degrading or being violent towards women. 

Title Address Description
Abkhazia
Abkhazia
Afghanistan
Afghanistan
Algeria
Algeria
Argentina
Argentina
Burma
Myanmar (Burma)
Cambodia
Cambodia
Colombia
Colombia
Congo
Democratic Republic of the Congo
India
India
Iran
Iran
Iraq
Iraq
Lebanon
Lebanon
Madagascar
Madagascar
Maldives
Maldives
Mauritania
Mauritania
The Mosou
Sichuan, China
Mozambique
Mozambique
Tajikstan
Tajikistan
Tunisia
Tunisia
Turkey
Turkey